Choose Truth

28Jun

ChooseTruth

Psalm137

In586 B.C., the soldiers from Babylon destroyed Jerusalem. (B.C. means years Before Christ came to the earth) They took the people that lived there as prisoners back to Babylon. In 536 B.C. many of the prisoners with their sons and daughters came back to Jerusalem. In 516 B.C., Persia (now Iran)destroyed Babylon.

Verses 1-3 indicate that this psalm was written in Babylon. If you look at verse 8, you will see that Persia has not yet destroyed Babylon. This means that the psalmist probably wrote the psalm between 536 and 516 B.C. This was the time of exile also known as the Diaspora.

There were two great rivers in Babylon, the Tigris and the Euphrates. The Jews during the exile met by these rivers. They probably talked about Jerusalem and Zion. Zion was one of the hills that they had built the city of Jerusalem on. The psalmist remembered this when he went home. He also remembered that they could not sing songs about the *LORD in Babylon. Now he was home again. And he hoped that somebody would destroy Babylon as Babylon had destroyed Jerusalem.

Scripture reading by Pat Mehring

Sermon by Pastor Keith Aurand

Recorded June 26, 2016

New Berlin, Wisconsin, USA

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Hope + Happiness = Confidence

24Jun

Hope+Happiness = Confidence

Colossians3:18-25

Paulnow gets down to the practical business of behaving in a way that is honoring to the Lord. In particular, he looks at family life. The family was the center of ancient society and many literary treatments on household ethics, duties and administration, were produced for general consumption. In fact, their form is very similar to Paul's summary of behavior in the Christian family. As can be seen from Paul's list, the family is wider than our Western nuclear family, and this because it includes slaves.

Scripture reading by Chuck Garrigues

Sermon by Pastor Keith Aurand

Recorded June 19, 2016

New Berlin, Wisconsin, USA

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Revitalize

1Jun

Revitalize

Kings18:20-39

It seems that some 21st century North Americans approach religion the way hungry people graze at a buffet. A little bit of this. A smidgen of that. A little bit of Christianity. A dollop of Buddhism. A sprinkling of Hinduism.

Since God is the God of all truth, people can learn some things from a variety of religions and faiths. Finally, however, all people need to choose to whom and what we’ll give our hearts and lives.

That’s essentially Elijah’s message for the Israelites. For more than two years God has sealed up the heavens so that no rain or dew has fallen on Israel. So whose fault is this terrible drought? King Ahab impliesit’s Elijah’s fault. He refers to the prophet as Israel’s“troubler,” perhaps because he earlier announced that God would send this drought. Elijah, however, speaks of Ahab as Israel’s troubler because his unfaithfulness has incurred God’s wrath.

Elijah isn’t interested in a theological debate. He wants a public confrontation that will provoke a religious decision. So the prophet challenges Ahab to invite Baal and Asherah’s prophets for a show down on Mount Carmel.

Scripture reading by Debbie Slater

Sermon by Pastor Keith Aurand

Recorded May 29, 2016

New Berlin, Wisconsin, USA

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